pinay e-motion

a heart across the ocean

Chronicle # 5: My Potential Teaching Persona

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This week my class in Instructional Design (ID) discussed one’s teaching persona, which despite teaching for many years, I haven’t really thought about. I must admit, I find it very intriguing intellectually. As we explored the topic, Davis (2013) described it as “the way teachers present a certain self to their audience of students.” No teaching persona gets created overnight, of course. It is said that seasoned educators go through the process of tweaking and adapting their tone and body language overtime. Hmmm… very interesting!

As a face-to-face instructor, every now and then I hear snippets of comments from my students, which give me a glimpse of how am I perceived by my students. However, other than that, my teaching persona is something of a mystery to me. Since I haven’t been a virtual instructor yet (and my ID class is, of course, geared towards online teaching), for this week’s project, we were assigned to submit a paper on our potential learning persona. I thought some of my teacher friends/readers might relate, so I elected to share my project in this chronicle.

blog_teachingpersonaSpecial credit: shutter stock

First, as an ESL instructor teaching online, I should be mindful that my students are coming from a very diverse population: age, proficiency, educational attainment, economic status, and cultural backgrounds. Thus, I must be careful in the use of my language, albeit I am known as sometimes “humorous” in my face-to-face instruction. From the onset, I may have to devise a diplomatic demeanor to avoid being misinterpreted since gestures and facial expression now will be absent form of my schema. I must be poised by being tactful, defusing difficult situations, and building good relationships with my students. This I can demonstrate by being respectful and thoughtful in my language while still being firm, fair, and consistent in my instruction.

Second, I must also be cognizant of my students’ digital literacy, which from my experience may pose as a challenge to some of my students. Depending on what course and level I teach, I must be cautious not only in my instructional approach (use of synchronous vs asynchronous method), but also in my employment of other technology learning tools. I plan to demonstrate it by being sensitive to my students’ computer skills, as well as being selective to digital learning platforms appropriate for my students’ needs. For language learning, I believe simple but meaningful activities are the ideal approach, especially for the struggling beginning students.

I understand that this approach is easier said than done, but I plan for my students to remember me as a substantive instructor in terms of subject content, yet enjoyable, empathetic, and empowering of my students and vibrant in my delivery. In short, attending my online class would be like a Goldilocks-experience – not hard, not soft, but just right!   ***

“To teach is to learn again” – Oliver Wendell Holmes

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